The 80-20 for Microsoft Project

During the two weeks I was taking care of little Wendy I also started reading The Four Hour Body by Timothy Ferriss. And apart from being an excellent guide to rapid fat-loss and perfecting sleep, there is one real interesting concept that got stuck in my mind: The Pareto or 80-20 principle. Tim is a great source for finding the 20% that produces 80% of the desired results. Now, let’s find out that 20% for Microsoft Project use!

Continue reading The 80-20 for Microsoft Project

Building a view in Microsoft Project, the correct way

As a consultant I travel between lots of companies that use Microsoft Project. Most of the time they use the product as a standalone scheduling tool when I first visit them. The common case is that they have taught themselves how to use the product and most of the time things go relatively smoothly.

This is not the case with views. Views in Microsoft Project are almost always created poorly. This post will be about creating views and about maintaining them properly. Continue reading Building a view in Microsoft Project, the correct way

What’s your status? Forgetting to set a status date (flaw 7)

Hey there,

Here is the second addition to my series on incorrect use of Microsoft Project stand alone version. It started as a list with 5 most common mistakes people use during there scheduling experiences, however some people have suggested additional flaws, this flaw was also hinted by Swagato Bandyopadhyay, thanks again, and hope you like this post as well. Continue reading What’s your status? Forgetting to set a status date (flaw 7)

Using predecessors in Summary tasks (flaw 6)

Hey People,

Let me start by thanking you for some of the great responses I got on my serries on incorrect way’s to use Microsoft Project stand alone version. Most people agreed on the flaws I noted in the series of blogs, and some had additions to the flaws.

I have picked a number of additional flaws, that I believe need to be discussed. Today I’ll post my thoughts on linking summary tasks. This flaw was suggested by Swagato Bandyopadhyay, thank you, I hope you like what I did with your suggestion. Continue reading Using predecessors in Summary tasks (flaw 6)

Not using the baseline functionality (flaw 5)

Hi there,

This is my last post in my series about incorrect way’s to use Microsoft Project stand alone version. In it I have discussed some of the common flaws people run into when using the Project application. This post will be about the baseline functionality, it is often forgotten or ignored by project managers. I will be talking about why you should want to have a baseline in your project. Again this is a very theoretical subject and you should always check with your company if there are any policies regarding baselining a project. Continue reading Not using the baseline functionality (flaw 5)

Too much detail in the schedule (flaw 4)

Hi there,

This is the fourth post in my series on incorrect use of Microsoft Project stand alone version. In my last post I talked about the lack of a Work Breakdown Structure, and this post will continue on that path. Please feel free to give your own insight on the subject because it is highly theoretical. Here goes!
Continue reading Too much detail in the schedule (flaw 4)

Lack of structure (Work Breakdown Structure) (flaw 3)

Hi there,

This is the third post in my series on incorrect use of Microsoft Project stand alone version. I hope you can relate to the situations I described so far and I hope you have learned some nice insights on the workings of MS Project. This post will be about structuring your project to an agreeable level. This structure is called a Work Breakdown Structure or WBS for short. Continue reading Lack of structure (Work Breakdown Structure) (flaw 3)

Capacity as Activity (flaw 2)

This is post number 2 in my series about incorrect use of Microsoft Project stand alone version. I started this series to get the most commonplace examples out in the world and help people understand Microsoft Project a little better. Once again, the images in these posts are build using the Microsoft Project 2013 Pro edition, but this series can be useful for all versions of the product. Continue reading Capacity as Activity (flaw 2)

Date related planning (flaw 1)

Hi there,

In my last post I announced 5 flaws that are common in using the stand alone version of Microsoft Project. Today I’m taking a closer look at “date related planning”.

So what is this flaw? Take a close look at this Gantt table, and more specifically the Indicators column (the blue i icon left to task mode):

Gantt table with calendars


Update 2018:

I started a YouTube channel in 2018. And on the channel I thought I’d add the incorrect ways of using Microsoft Project articles. It’s a new way of sharing the information that’s in this post and I hope you’ll enjoy:


 

Continue reading Date related planning (flaw 1)